Buying a home or an investment?

The following article continues along the themes of a previous article that I wrote entitled: Renting Versus Buying. This article supposes that you have enough for a deposit on a house. Looking at the purely financial side of the transactions: Should you invest it or buy yourself a home?
Picture from jscreationzs 

Buy a home to live in or buy an investment property?


We're going to view this problem purely as a numbers game, so let's take a look at the excel spreadsheet below. The same principals would work for any currency.

Let us say you purchase a home worth £200,000, and you put a 20% deposit down, requiring you to put down £40,000. Let us assume that interest on your Mortgage is at 6%. From here onwards, costs will be considered on a weekly basis.

Regardless of whether this house becomes a home or an investment property, the weekly mortgage repayments are still £185 a week, which in the case of a home is your total costs.

In the case of buying the house as an investment property you will obviously receive a weekly rental income. This is usually worked out at 4% of the total price of the property, in which case you receive £153 a week in rental income.

In the UK up to £4250 of tax free income can be claimed on rental income and so we write that as a tax refund, giving you a weekly refund of £82.

So far we are making £50 a week more than we're paying out on this investment property due to the weekly repayments and tax refund. However, you've got to live somewhere. You can now afford to rent somewhere even more expensive than your investment property, for example, paying £200 a week, so that your total weekly costs on housing are £150, which is £15 a week lower than had you just bought a home. Throw into the mix the obvious fact that other people are paying for your mortgage (ego boost!) and you're onto a winner.

Assumptions


Now I am very aware of the assumptions made here and I think I should outline them to you, just to be upfront and honest:

  • Interest rates may be higher (or lower) than 6% and will fluctuate
  • Rent received may be lower (or higher) depending on the area
  • I have only included the £4250 tax free rental income in the 'Tax Refund' section, of course this could be a much larger number as you could write off landlord insurance and other business expenses
  • It doesn't include the 'cost' of the hassle of having to deal with tenants
  • It doesn't deal with the possibility that you may not have tenants for a period of time in which case you will have to pay the full mortgage interest repayment and your own rental income for those weeks

What do you think? Is is worth buying an investment property or should you just keep your finances simple and just buy a normal home?



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The Biggest Secret of the Rich (Part 4)

This article follows on from a previous one, The Biggest Secret of the Rich (Part 3), as part of a series of four on the main reasons as to why people are unable to emulate the hard work necessary to generate the success of the rich. If you would like to start from the beginning of the series (recommended) then please click on the following article: The Biggest Secret of the Rich (Part1).

Becoming rich

Lack of Ability

Photo From Stockimages
This article concludes this current series on The Biggest Secret of the Rich, that discussed what hard work actually means and possible ideas why people may 'choose' to not work hard. Reasons discussed thus-far are indifference and laziness. We now turn to the most controversial excuse for not becoming successful: Lack of Ability.

Some people claim that they aren't successful or rich because they lack the ability, the natural skills, the inherent and inherited talents to reach the those sorts of successes. Having acknowledged that they will never be as successful as the rich, they claim to work hard and try to specialise in an area in which they believe their limited talents are best suited.

Now some of you may accuse me of being too right wing, and that is fair enough (feel free to rant at me in the comments area below). However, I truly believe that, whilst we are not all created equally, we each have the ability to level the playing field.

What do I mean by this?

It is my firm belief that whether or not you were blessed with the natural ability to absorb information efficiently and effectively, or have some wonderful talents, this has no bearing on whether you will be successful or not. I'm sure you can think of plenty of examples of people you knew when you were growing up whom you perceived as much cleverer than you who are not as successful as you'd thought they'd be.

Furthermore, I would put money on the fact that everyone can think of an example of someone they knew as they were growing up who didn't seem to amount to much, but since then, later in life, has gone on to be quite successful in a field of their choosing. In particular, there are plenty of examples of people who fail at school, scrape into a university or a college, but then, as if by magic, seem to get their act together, and go on to get great jobs, start great businesses and lead successful lives.

It is very clear that it doesn't matter where you start in life: rich; poor; stupid; clever, with the right attitude it seems that the human mind (and body) can overcome most predicaments. For any of you who have read the book 'Outliers' by Malcolm Gladwell it is very clear that if you are willing to put enough time into anything you can truly achieve anything you want. To be able to commit this amount of time needs series guts and tenacity. That is all about a state of mind.

Success is a state of mind, and nothing to do with ability. Ability is not an excuse.


To read other articles in this series: Part1, Part2, Part 3

Do you like what you've read? Tell your friends by sharing it with one of the buttons below. Please post this to Facebook or Tweet it to help your friends and family. Feel free to send me an email (mrmoneybanks<at>multimillionaireroad<dot>com), find me on twitter @millionairer0ad or comment. Whether good or bad, I want to hear from you all.

The Biggest Secret of the Rich (Part 3)

This article follows on from a previous one, The Biggest Secret of the Rich (Part 2), as part of a series of four on the main reasons as to why people are unable to emulate the hard work necessary to generate the success of the rich. If you would like to start from the beginning of the series (recommended) then please click on the following article: The Biggest Secret of the Rich (Part1).

If you want to be rich don't be lazy

Photo from imagerymajestic

Laziness

One of the possible reasons for not wanting to work hard could be a result of sheer laziness. Sadly it is the case that many people will try to find all sorts of excuses as to why they can't work harder on something or as to why they aren't successful. I always find it ironic that some of these excuses given are extremely intricate and well thought out. It makes you wonder what this person could have achieved if they'd spent as much time and effort on work than on their excuses.

Some people may argue that rest is important and that people can't be expected to work all the time. This is true, and a little time off from work here and there can be a restful benefit for the mind allowing for more efficient work when you return to the job at hand. However, I worry that some people may use 'the need for rest' argument as an excuse not to put much effort in at all. These same people are the ones who complain that they aren't successful!

Just like in the case of Indifference I believe that some people use laziness as an excuse not to work for fear of failure. Sentences like "I value my free time" may really be revealing an avoidance of hard work for fear of failure. Whilst, by any means, I would not suggest that it was true for all people I am bothered that people can use the same valid argument as an excuse for not trying.

However, it is the case that not all people aim to work all the time. These sorts of people measure their success in other ways. For example they may genuinely relish and enjoy leisure time, and that it absolutely fine. If they are happy living like this then that's fine. My only point to these people is that they shouldn't complain that they do not have all that they desire as they have only themselves to blame for their circumstances.

Anne Frank famously wrote in her diary:
"Laziness may appear attractive, but work gives satisfaction"
I felt that this quote would be a neat why to finish off this article. It encapsulates my lack of understanding of people who would not want to work hard, for whatever reason. May we all work hard and live happier lives.


For other parts in this series, click: Part 1, Part 2, Part 4

Do you like what you've read? Tell your friends by sharing it with one of the buttons below. Please post this to Facebook or Tweet it to help your friends and family. Feel free to send me an email (mrmoneybanks<at>multimillionaireroad<dot>com), find me on twitter @millionairer0ad or comment. Whether good or bad, I want to hear from you all.

The Biggest Secret of the Rich (Part 2)

This article follows on from a previous one, The Biggest Secret of the Rich (Part 1), as part of a series of four on the main reasons as to why people are unable to emulate the hard work necessary to generate the success of the rich.

Becoming rich is not easy

Indifference

Photo from Stuart Miles

Quick Recap: Hard work

Colin Powel once said:
"A Dream does not become reality through magic; it takes sweat, determination and hard work"
As was made quite clear in the previous article in this series, becoming successful (however you choose to mark that success) requires hard work. Furthermore, that hard work has little to do with luck.

If we're all clear on what it is that will lead us to be successful then what is it that we're doing wrong, or what do we lack, preventing us from reaching our full potential?

Indifference

One possibility is that we are indifferent. Some people would suggest that people aren't bothered to work hard because they are indifferent to success. People aren't bothered to become an expert in something, specialise or better themselves. They'd much rather sit at home watching TV. Becoming successful sounds like too much hard work.

What Indifference Really is:

This sort of attitude astounds me. How can anyone not want to better themselves, improve themselves, reach their full potential and maybe stretch beyond it? I find it hard to believe that anyone who seriously argues that they are indifferent to success isn't lying. It is more plausible that this sort of person doesn't want to risk failure in a task that they put their full efforts into.

To this person I would suggest that you take a long look at yourself and question your 'indifference'. If it is fear of failure then be reassured that if you fail in whatever task you are trying to complete, that isn't the end. You learn from your mistakes and try again, even harder. Failure is not an excuse for not working hard. There is nothing wrong with failure, but there is something wrong with failing to do anything about it.


Look out for the next part in this mini series on the reasons why people are unable to reach their full potential. The next article will be on Laziness.


For other parts in this series, click: Part 1Part 3, Part 4

Do you like what you've read? Tell your friends by sharing it with one of the buttons below. Please post this to Facebook or Tweet it to help your friends and family. Feel free to send me an email (mrmoneybanks<at>multimillionaireroad<dot>com), find me on twitter @millionairer0ad or comment. Whether good or bad, I want to hear from you all.

The Biggest Secret of the Rich (Part 1)

The following article is the first part of a series of four articles on the main reasons why many people are unable to emulate the ability of successful people.

The Big Secret of the Rich

Photo from freedigitalphotos
Want to know what the biggest secret of the rich is?

Are you ready for it?

Are you sure you want to hear it?

Really?

Well, Ok. Here it comes...

...The biggest secret of the rich is...[drum roll if you please]...hard work...

Disappointed? You shouldn't be, it's true. The majority of newly made rich people become rich through sheer hard work and determination. Now, some of you may feel a little cheated with my misleading question. Some of you may be furious (if a little extreme reaction) with me, exclaiming “We already knew that”, “Well that’s obvious”.


Fair enough. So my question to you is: “If it’s so obvious why aren't we all rich?”

It seems to me that there are three main reasons as to why we are not able to implement the one we thing we know will make us rich. These are:
These three core areas will form the basis for three follow up articles on each area, discussing how to counter these three excuses for not working hard to be successful.

In the meantime I believe it necessary to fully define 'hard work'.

Hard Work

There are two ways to get rich. You can get lucky, for example by winning the lottery. However I don't recommend this route. In the English lottery your odds of winning are more than 14 million to one, that is, extremely unlikely. In fact I have heard it quoted that you are more likely to be run over than to win the lottery (be reassured that this morbid thought is also highly unlikely). Alternatively you can  work extremely hard, pushing the limits of your natural ability. By hard work I mean putting all your efforts and pooling all your resources towards achieving your goals. I believe that anyone can become successful if only they would apply themselves to the field in which they have a comparative advantage (simply, focus on the area that they have a relatively natural greater ability in than other areas, as compared to other people).

When I say 'hard work', I don't mean getting up 5 days a week and working 9 until 5 and breezing through the day then coming home and switching off. I mean sustained maximum effort, not just at work but at home as well. When not working extremely hard to impress at work, to progress and boost your salary, you should be working on a side business, researching investments, learning how to improve yourself, and generally being productive.

Some of you may point towards the argument that many people who are successful in business, or get the promotions achieve their level of success through sheer good luck. They were in the right place at the right time. To this type of argument I pose another question: 

When someone gets a hole in one in golf, have they got lucky? 

Your immediate reaction is to say that of course they got lucky! Think of all the parameters and variables involved in someone getting a hole in one: angle the ball was hit, weight of club, type of club, direction of hit, strength of hit, amount of wind, gradient of the green. Anyone getting a hole in one has just got lucky and probably wouldn't be able to recreate such a feat.

Now let me ask you another question:

When Tiger Woods hits a hole in one, has he just got lucky?

The same reasoning should apply. The variables involved have to be so perfect that even the great Tiger Woods rarely hits a hole in one and probably couldn't recreate the hole in one on the same hole immediately after one success. So surely that is just luck as well. You could then take the argument to the ridiculous extreme and suggest that Tiger Woods is only successful in golf because he's regularly lucky. However, wouldn't we accept that Tiger Woods would get more hole in ones in his lifetime than you or I? If that is the case then why is that? He probably isn't a particularly lucky person, no more than you or I. Tiger Woods gets more hole in ones because  he practices for hours trying that shot and because he knows what's involved in achieving a hole in one from all his practice of the shot he is more likely to achieve it.

It is clearly the case that the more you practice, the more effort you put in to trying to be successful, the 'luckier' you get. But it doesn't happen by magic. Put the effort in and you increase your probability of reward many times over.


Please look out for the following three parts of this series on The Biggest Secrets of the Rich.

Do you like what you've read? Tell your friends by sharing it with one of the buttons below. Please post this to Facebook or Tweet it to help your friends and family. Feel free to send me an email (mrmoneybanks<at>multimillionaireroad<dot>com), find me on twitter @millionairer0ad or comment. Whether good or bad, I want to hear from you all.

Quick Tips for Saving Money at Home

The following article outlines  a few quick tips for saving money in your home. Whether you have a small one bed flat or a 10 bed mansion, these tips should help all people on all budgets.


Home Savings

Sourced from digitalphotots
People trying to save more money or pay off more debt tend to look at how they can increase their income to boost their cashflow, or look at how to save money on the big expenses. What people are forgetting is that many small changes can add up and make a bigger difference to your cash flow. In the same theme as my previous article on how to make some savings when going on your regular shop, here are a few tips on saving a bit of cash on home expenses.

Reuse and Recycle

Very simple really. Don't waste! When I was growing up I was always told by my mum to eat all the food on my plate as there are children in Africa who would love to eat it. Whilst the comment was well-intentioned and was an effort to prevent waste, I couldn't help but think: how does my stuffing my face help alleviate African poverty?!
But I digress. Whilst I don't expect you to stuff your face to prevent wastage, there is no reason why you can't save leftovers in tupaware/ foil containers/ clingfilm over bowls or plates. Have whatever it is for lunch the next day. As long as it's still edible (i.e. you didn't cough on it/ vomit it up), there's no reason why you can't finish it the next day. Never let good food go to waste.

Slow Cookers

The brilliance of slow cookers is that even though you leave them on for hours, they actually save large amounts of energy as they use far less electricity than cooking on a normal electric cooker in a few minutes. This means that your electricity bills are lower. Yey! Furthermore, cooking with a slow cooker is really easy, you just throw it all in. Furthermore, some of the meals made with a slow cooker are divine. The slow cooking of meat helps the proteins retain more moisture making the meat much juicer and tender.

Diet

An interesting little tip to save some money involves improving your diet. Simply by eating less meat and more vegetables can save a small fortune over the year. The logic is simple, meat costs more than vegetables. Dieticians recommend that if you divide up your plate you should have half of it covered in vegetables, one quarter with meat, and one quarter with carbohydrates.

Lightbulb Idea

One bright idea (!) would be to change all the lightbulbs in your house or flat over to energy saving bulbs. Lighting accounts for 8% of an average household's energy bills. If you replace each bulb with a compact fluorescent bulb of the same brightness you will save £3 per bulb per year. This amounts to about £55 worth of savings over the life of the bulb. Multiply that over all the bulbs in your house and you can start to see the big advantages.

Do you like what you've read? Tell your friends by sharing it with one of the buttons below. Please post this to Facebook or Tweet it to help your friends and family. Feel free to send me an email (mrmoneybanks<at>multimillionaireroad<dot>com), find me on twitter @millionairer0ad or comment. Whether good or bad, I want to hear from you all.

Quick Supermarket Saving Tips

The following article outlines a few quick tips on frugality and for saving money on your supermarket shopping bill. Whether you only buy for yourself or are trying to budget for a family of 5, these tips should help all people on all budgets.

5 tips when shopping

Make a List and Check it Twice

Before you even consider stepping foot out of the door, make sure you know what you're going to buy. Only go out to buy what you need. By having a list you make it easier to control your urges to buy whatever takes your fancy. Interestingly, research has shown that it is better to eat before you go on the big weekly food shop. This is because, shopping on a full stomach helps to stem the sudden urges for all your favourite foods that comes with shopping whilst hungry.

Meal Ideas

In a similar fashion to the advice above, preparing meals in advance will allow you to work out what exactly you needs. This means that you aren't buying things that you don't actually need and that there is no waste. Make a list of what to buy following this planning stage.

Shopping Time

I recently went to my local Tescos Express at about 8pm at night and was amazed to find the unbelievable discounts on food items such as bread, vegetables and milk. After asking the manager he explained that this happens everyday as they need to get rid of old stock to replace it with new. There is nothing wrong with the products other than that they are a day old. He explained that discounts tend to start at about 7pm every evening. Why don't you try this out. Let me know how you get on.

Economies of Scale

This is a simple idea in economics. I use it here to covey how the more you buy in bulk, the cheaper the cost per unit of each good. Without boring you too much, this is all to do with Area-to-volume ratios...blah blah blah...the point is, buying more of something (in one go) that you are going to use regularly, such as toilet roll, if you can store it buy it in bulk and enjoy the savings over time.

Discounts

British people in their snobbish attitude find this particular find this hard: Ask for discounts, particularly on big expensive items. There is nothing wrong with it. Next time you are buying a big electrical item such as a TV don't be afraid to ask the manager for money off. What's the worst that is going to happen?! Either he will say no, or even better, he might say yes. You could get up to or more than 20% off the price of these items.

Do you like what you've read? Tell your friends by sharing it with one of the buttons below. Please post this to Facebook or Tweet it to help your friends and family. Feel free to send me an email (mrmoneybanks<at>multimillionaireroad<dot>com), find me on twitter @millionairer0ad or comment. Whether good or bad, I want to hear from you all.

Savers' Savvy Sayings (Part 2)

The following article is the second part to a two-part mini-series. This particular article focuses on useful tips associated with saving and investing.

The following article is part of a series of two. They are a collection of memorable sayings to help all people concerned with personal finance. Part 1 includes sayings associated with the building of savings in the Multimillionaire Road Get Rich Plan. These include ideas such as working hard, budgeting and careful spending to increase your wealth. Part 2 is to do with how to invest and keep those savings to build your existing wealth.

Part 2: Sayings for Keeping your Savings


Borrowing:

The borrower becomes the lender's slave
You can't build wealth if you owe others money. That is why, after paying for your needs (not wants) the next priority is paying off debt. Debt is the rock sinking your financial boat as you sail the wide Accountan-Sea. You can't ride on the waves of wealth until you unload yourself of your heavy cargo.

Saving:

Don't save what is left after spending; spend what is left after saving
As I mentioned in part 1, part of the mistake that non-savers tend to make is that they prioritize spending wrong. When they complain that there isn't money left-over after current spending to save they have already made the mistake. After paying for your needs such as bills and food, the next job is to pay off debt and then transfer money from your current account to a savings account. My personal target it 20% but I want to push that by the end of 2013 to 25%. Only after you have saved a substantial portion of your income (i.e. not simply a few pennies here and there), only then should you buy any luxuries.

Investment:

Don't put all your eggs in one basket
We've all heard this one before. It suggests that the process of investing should involve diversification of your assets. Make sure that you spread your risk over several stocks, shares, asset classes, both liquid and illiquid.

Risk:

Never test the depth of a river with both feet
The idea here is a simple but powerful one. It suggests that if you are going to invest in a risky asset class, make sure it is only a small portion of your income. This is part of the idea of diversification.

If you found this article interesting, why not check out the first part of the two-part mini-series.


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Savers' Savvy Sayings (Part 1)


The following article is part 1 of a series of two articles on catchy phrases to help the reader as to what to keep in mind when conducting financial affairs:

The following article is part of a series of two. They are a collection of memorable sayings to help all people concerned with personal finance. Part 1 includes sayings associated with the building of savings in the Multimillionaire Road Get Rich Plan. These include ideas such as working hard, budgeting and careful spending to increase your wealth. Part 2 is to do with how to invest and keep those savings to build your existing wealth.

Part 1: Sayings for Building your Savings

Working:

All hard work leads to profit; but mere talk leads only to poverty
There's no use wondering and complaining that you don't have enough money for your spending needs. The  advice here is to be active and do something about your current income situation.There is not substitute for hard graft and hard work will pay off eventually.

Laziness:

A sleeping lobster is carried away by the water current

Likewise, being indifferent to your situation will not help you gain financial freedom. You need to be motivated, keeping a clear goal in mind. Then there is a target to work towards and the hard work can begin.

Earning:

Never depend on a single source of income
To become financially independent you need multiple income sources. Ideally these should be passive income streams that do not require much time or management to continue to provide an income for yourself. The idea is that you pay yourself first. The old saying is true: "the rich do become richer" because they understand that in life you need to pay yourself first so that in future you can earn more money.

Budgeting:

It's pointless to carry an umbrella if you're shoes are leaking
Keeping a tight grasp of your income and outgoings is so crucial to personal finance. There are people in the world on £500,000 salaries who spend £500,000 and so do not save and have little or no wealth. Then there are those who are on £50,000 but only spend £25,000, building a sizeable share of savings over their lifetime. Keeping a strong financial foundation is key to building wealth and this is achieved by careful budgeting, managing your money in such a way that each month you keep more than you spend.

Spending:

If you buy things you don't need, you'll soon sell the things you need
Buy needs, not wants. Your priority in spending should always be: needs, debt, savings, wants; in that order. If your spending patterns are in any other sort of order then you are not prioritizing correctly and may never make it to financial freedom.


Expenditure:

Beware of little expenses; a small leak can sink a large ship
In a similar fashion as before, keeping a watchful eye over spending habits it key to getting out of debt and building wealth. Even the little expenses can cripple you over time. Buying a coffee on your way to work every morning may cost you £3 a day. With 5 days a week, working on average 45 of them adds up to £675 spent on coffee per year, and £6750 over 10 years. With the one small change of bringing your own coffee to work instead of buying it you could save yourself thousands over your lifetime. With many small changes you could save yourself hundreds of thousands.

Please look out for the second Part of this mini series which will focus on savings and investments.

Let me know what you thought of my analysis of each phrase in the comments box below.


Do you like what you've read? Tell your friends by sharing it with one of the buttons below. Please post this to Facebook or Tweet it to help your friends and family. Feel free to send me an email (mrmoneybanks<at>multimillionaireroad<dot>com), find me on twitter @millionairer0ad or comment. Whether good or bad, I want to hear from you all. 

Buying a car: Getting money off

In continuation with the theme of frugality and of cars, I found out this method of buying cars from an interview with an economist talking about how to buy cars using Game Theory. It makes a lot of sense and is definitely advice that I will follow when next buying a car:


The Get Money Off The Price Of Your Car Trick

We could all afford to shave a few pounds of the price when purchasing a new car. It's very simple. Just follow, word for word, the transcript below.

The Transcript:

Decide exactly what car you want to buy in terms of make, colour (if matters), options etc.
CRITICAL: Do no go to a dealership! For this to work you will need to use the telephone only.
Phone all dealers who sell the car that you are interested in, who reside within a 50 mile radius (or however far you are willing to travel to pick up the car).
To each dealership that you call the following transcript must be followed:

You: Hi my name is [insert name], I plan to buy [vehicle of interest] today at [pick a designated time]. I am going to buy it from the dealership who gives me the best price.

Dealer: Hello sir/madame, you can't buy a car on the telephone. Come in and we will give you the best price.

You: I know I can buy a car this way. I know people that have bought cars over the telephone before. If you don't quote a price for me, I understand that you are telling me that you know you don't have the best price for me, in which case I don't intend to take up any more of your time and I appreciate you saving my time.

At this point the dealer will say one of 3 things:
1) Goodbye, in which case phone up the next dealer and start again
2) Will quote you a price, in which case you make a note of it and call up the next dealer
3) The dealer will say "yes but if I tell you a price you will call the next dealer and that dealer will quote a price that is £50 lower than the price I have quoted and then you will buy their car"

You: That's right so if you can go £50 lower this is your opportunity because I will buy from whoever can give me the lowest price. Furthermore I need the full total price that includes taxes and everything. I don't want to turn up and find you have charged me a couple of hundred extra for whatever gizmo or modcom you felt the need to add. I want the full price. When I come in I will not discuss the price. Instead I will come in with a cheque for the full amount made out to whoever gave me the lowest price. If you renege I will walk out and go to the next dealership and offer them the second best price cheque that I will also have on me and so on and so forth. So...what is your best price?


Buying a car: Analysis

Using this script forces the dealer into making you the best possible offer. It forces the dealer into competition with other dealers without the other dealers even having to be there. Thus they are forced into a competitive bargaining situation in which the true market value of the car is revealed. This is the lowest possible price for the car you want within the 50 mile radius.

Have any of you bought a car using this method/ a similar method?
Let me know how you('ve) get on.

Do you like what you've read? Tell your friends by sharing it with one of the buttons below. Please post this to Facebook or Tweet it to help your friends and family. Feel free to send me an email (mrmoneybanks<at>multimillionaireroad<dot>com), find me on twitter @millionairer0ad or comment. Whether good or bad, I want to hear from you all. 

Disclaimer

Information on this site is not appropriate for the purposes of making a decision for carrying out a transaction or trade nor does it provide any form of advice (investment, tax or legal) amounting to investment advice, or make any recommendations regarding particular financial instruments, investments, or products.
Always seek advice of a competent financial advisor with any questions you may have regarding a financial matter